CBD and THC interact with our bodies in a variety of ways. One of the main ways they impact us is by mimicking and augmenting the effects of the compounds in our bodies called “endogenous cannabinoids” - so named because of their similarity to the compounds found in the cannabis plant. These “endocannabinoids” are part of a regulatory system called the “endocannabinoid system”.

Before beginning any treatment, it is important that you consult your healthcare provider and be open and honest about your plans. Having a strong doctor-patient relationship is key to establishing trust and determining an effective treatment plan that takes into account your lifestyle. “These drugs do interact with the body,” Dr. Silberstein says. “If you’re getting funny symptoms and you’re taking something that the doctor doesn’t know about, how’s he going to help you?”
The human body also produces cannabinoids, known as endocannabinoids, in a bodily system known as the endocannabinoid system (or ECS). The ECS promotes homeostasis by regulating a wide range of functions, including motor skills, mood, appetite, and sleep. As we age, our ECS produces fewer endocannabinoids; they may also decrease due to physical injury or disease. Replenishing depleted endocannabinoids with phytocannabinoids like CBD can help restore balance to the body.
Canola oil. Canola oil is low in saturated fat, Haas says. Unhealthy saturated fat is solid at room temperature and comes mostly from animal products like meat and dairy. In 2006, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) decided that manufacturers could claim that 1 1/2 tablespoons of canola oil a day may reduce the risk of coronary heart disease when used instead of saturated fat. Canola oil has a higher smoke point than olive oil and can be used safely for cooking at high temperatures. It doesn’t have as much flavor as some other vegetable and seed oils, though, so you may not want to use it in recipes like salad dressings where you want the oil to add some flavor, Warren says.
A wealth of marketing material, blogs and anecdotes claim that cannabis oils can cure whatever ails you, even cancer. But the limited research doesn't suggest that cannabis oil should take the place of conventional medication, except for in two very rare forms of epilepsy (and even then, it's recommended only as a last-resort treatment). And, experts caution that because cannabis oil and other cannabis-based products are not regulated or tested for safety by the government or any third-party agency, it's difficult for consumers to know exactly what they're getting.
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